July 2019 - Infinity Arts Center

July 29, 2019
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Self-confidence is key to success, and theatre participation can increase confidence in children of all ages. Theatre utilizes many gifts including storytelling, language, movement, voice and even technical elements. When children use and refine these gifts, they are affirmed in their learning experience.

 

Next week, our Hollywood Camp brings excitement and skill-building activities to your children. It’s just one of the many fun and creative camps we are offering this summer at Infinity Arts Center. Read on to learn five fast facts about Hollywood Camp:

 

1.      Hollywood Camp will ENGAGE young campers. Your child will discover how to sing, act, dance and be crafty in just 1 week. In fact, during Hollywood Camp, your child will be the celebrity! We’ll learn everything about show business and Hollywood!

 

2.      Hollywood Camp is coming up quickly. It will be held July 29 – August 2 from 9AM –4PM. Don’t let your child miss out!

 

3.      The camp is offered to kids ages 6-12. We have planned this special camp just for that age group, so you can be sure it will be an engaging and valuable experience for your child.

 

4.      Before Care will be offered from 7-9AM each day, as well as After Care from 4-6PM each day. We want to help you fit our camps into your busy life!

 

5.      We find that different camp schedules might work better for different campers and their parents. We’ll be offering Hollywood Camp as a Full-Day or Half-Day option. Besides attending the full day, your child can attend from 9AM-12PM or 1-4PM.

 

These are just five facts about our Hollywood Camp, but here is the most important fact of all: You can register for camp by visiting our sign-up page–  https://campscui.active.com/orgs/InfinityArtsCenter#/selectSessions/2535314

July 10, 2019
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At Infinity Arts Center, all of our classes have an impressively low student-teacher ratio. Small class sizes ensure that students receive a quality arts education through hands-on learning.

When you or your child sign up for one of our classes, camps, workshops or after-school programs, you can be sure to get the one-on-one nurturing small class sizes provide. Read on to learn about eight benefits of low student-teacher ratios.

  1. Working One-on-One

Students and teachers at IAC have plenty of opportunities to work together one-on-one, allowing the opportunity to tailor instruction toward the student’s needs.

  1. Participation Opportunities

Small groups mean having to compete less for participation opportunities. Students can have their voices heard and apply what they are learning to class discussions.

  1. All Students are Noticed

In large classes, students can hide and get left behind. But, fewer students means that each one gets the attention he or she deserves.

  1. Ability to Focus on Learning

In classrooms with fewer students, teachers can spend more time teaching the material and less time regaining the attention of students who might be easily distracted. They can also cater to different learning styles among students.

  1. More Efficient Learning

Students learn more in small classes, and they also learn faster. This means the class will progress through material more quickly, and students will have the opportunity to learn even more per class.

  1. More Feedback

In classes with smaller student-to-teacher ratios, teachers have time to customize their feedback to students. With individualized feedback, students get the help they need to reach their potential.

  1. Ideas are Expressed

In small classes, students have more time to share ideas and perspectives. They can explore their opinions and gain the confidence to express those opinions openly.

  1. Classrooms are Communities

With fewer students per class, students support each other and can connect more personally with classmates, which can lead to lasting friendships. Join the IAC community by enrolling in one of our summer camps or fall classes!


July 1, 2019
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We live in a world of complementary dualities, each of which is a part of a complete whole.  Light complements dark, sorrow complements joy, effort complements ease, sleep and relaxation (down time) complement our working life.  In life as in art, the negative spaces empower and define the positive ones.  Each defines the other, each gives life to the other, and thus in our world the whole exists.  They are sides of a single coin.

In fashion now are the sciences, currently called STEM, science, technology, engineering and math.  Sciences are concerned with the physical world, the observable and quantifiable.  They seek to understand how the physical universe is constructed, how it works, how it might be changed to adapt to circumstances, how it might serve people.   The sciences work with what can be logically proven or disproven through experimentation.   Together, the sciences have brought about immense and rapid advances in our understanding and in applications in our physical world.

My grandmother began life in a world in which the use of horses was still common.  Before she passed, men traveled to the moon.  Technology in the present advances even more rapidly. The quickened pace of these advances comes at a cost.  In order to devote the amount of attention and cultural value to STEM topics and to fully support these rapid advances, we have largely neglected the partner of STEM, the arts.

Arts – visual arts, music, dance, theater, literature, philosophy and writing, to include some – are more concerned with that which is less readily apprehensible.  Arts apply themselves to our values, our pursuit of wisdom, subjective perceptions and emotions, and to concepts such as joy, beauty and existential truth.  STEM deals exceptionally well with the concretely physical; arts express marvelously our souls.  Both are necessary.

Our world today is unbalanced; some would say it is chaotic.   This is not amazing if we notice that we have neglected the sisters of STEM.  The whole cannot be complete while only half of it is fully accepted and appreciated.  Putting an “A” into the acronym “STEM” to make “STEAM” does little.  The four strands of STEM are still emphasized while the arts are lumped together and given lip service.

At one time – my grandmother’s and maybe also my mother’s – arts had a greater place in our culture.  Schools gave emphasis to literature, writing and music.  Elocution, painting, drawing and crafts were also given instructional time, and exhibitions of these were valued.  Dance and theater were not only performing arts, to be enjoyed if one had time and money, but also often popular pastimes.   In private life, there was time to create beauty.   Math and science were certainly not ignored, but the whole was more balanced.

Not so today.  Schools emphasize and promote STEM subjects, and parents rush to enroll their children in STEM summer camps and extracurricular lessons. Arts in the schools are underfunded and minimal.

We have lost something.  Social structures have lost center or direction as they change and grow.  Balance is good as change progresses; it keeps the change from falling into destructive chaos.  We have lost that balance, that sense of direction, that guidance system.  Some would say we have lost our soul.  Re-including and re-establishing the importance of what we have neglected can help restore what we have lost.

Let us individually grow our whole selves, both the logical and the intuitive, with a sense of the wonder of the universe.

Peace, Diane

You can find more from Diane at  http://thevoicefromthebackrow.com/